Source Field

For Documents

This field should only be used for published documents to indicate where the document was published. All published documents must have a Source.

Leave this field blank if the document was not published.

Put in as full a citation for a published document as possible.

  • For journals— Author, Article title, journal title Vol.:Issue (date), p. (or pp.) page range.
  • For books — Author, Book title, (City: Publisher, Year), page range (if this is a chapter or other selection)

Examples:

Jane Addams, "Why Girls Go Wrong," Ladies Home Journal (September 1907), pp. 13-14.

"Jane Addams Pleads for Wayward Girls," New York Times, December 9, 1911, p. 7.

Jane Addams, "The Unexpected Reactions of a Traveler in Egypt," Atlantic Monthly 113 (February 1914), pp. 178-86.

Finding aid, Jane Addams Papers, Swarthmore Peace Collection, Swarthmore College. (if the finding aid is online, link to it).

For Collections

Include a link to the finding aid, ir there is one, in this field, so that the reader can consult it directly. For archives, add a link to their home page.

Example:

Finding Aid: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/scrc/findingaids/view.php?eadid=ICU.SPCL.EGABBOTT

For Images

This space should be used to indicate the source of a picture attached to the page.The source citation should be linked when possible to the page that contains metadata about the photo, not to the photo. Use Picture: and then the source.

Example: Link to this page, not that page.

Archives

Make sure that the archive does not require permission to use images. Many, like the Library of Congress, provide rights information, others will ask you to contact them to obtain permission. We prefer using the former. If you find an image and we need to ask for permission, ask Cathy or Tori to do it so that we can track progress easier. Use the name of the archive as the source. Treat Find A Grave like this as well.

Picture: Library of Congress.

Picture: Swarthmore Peace Collection

Picture: Find A Grave

Ancestry resources

Use the year of the passport application, and the collection name.

Picture: 1922, U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925

On yearbooks, use the school name, and year of publication

Picture: Lakewood High School yearbook, 1934

If you locate a photograph in an Ancestry family tree of the person, we need to contact the person who put it up and ask for permission. Ask Cathy to do this. If permission is granted, we will treat it like a personal collection.

Books and Journal Articles (published before 1923)

Cite books that are in public domain when you obtain photos from them. Do not use books that are not in public domain as a source of images. If the book is available on Hathi Trust, the Internet Archvie, or Google Books, you can add a link.

Picture: Clifton Rodman Wooldridge. Hands Up! in the World of Crime. Chicago, IL: C.C. Thompson Company, 1906. 4.
Picture: Walt Mason, Walt Mason, His Book, New York, NY: Barse & Hopkins Publishers, 1916, frontspiece.

Picture: Socialists Again Elect Milwaukee Mayor, The Survey, April 15, 1916, p. 70.

Newspapers (published before 1923)

Like books, we can only use newspapers that are in the public domain as sources of images. Otherwise we will need to obtain permission.

Picture: Los Angeles Times, August 7, 1915, p. 13.

Personal Collections

We might obtain scans of photographs from a private person. We want to cite that person.

Picture: Private collection of [person's name].

Websites

Do not use a blog or general webpage that contains a picture as its source. We need the location of the original photograph. If there is a citation on the webpage, we will go to that location to find the right source. If you cannot find a citation and cannot locate the image elsewhere using a Google photo search, then we won't use it. If you can contact the creator to find out where the photo came from, try that as a means to use the photo.

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